Posts Tagged ‘Medicine’

When working as an ear, nose and throat surgeon George Tkalych performed thousands of procedures on both adults and children. For the latter he was often called upon to help children with their fears of surgery. This is something that parents can help medical professionals with by properly preparing their children for the prospect of visiting the hospital. The following are all techniques that you can use.

George Tkalych

Be There At All Times

Doctors recognize that having a parent present will help soothe the nerves of young children, so make it a point to be there at all times for your child. You can often work in conjunction with your child’s doctor to explain complex procedures, while also providing the comfort the child needs to feel more confident in trusting what the doctor is saying.

Role Play

You can also take steps with your child at home to prepare for a doctor’s appointment. One of the best ways to do this is to roleplay the visit to the best of your abilities. By playing the role of doctor you will give your child a better understanding of what to expect during the appointment. Demonstrate how doctors might take blood pressure or measure a heartbeat to reduce fear of the instruments they use.

Validate Fears

Fear of a visit to the doctor’s is completely rational, especially in children. Avoid using language that suggests your child is wrong for feeling this way. Instead, offer encouragement to help them face their fears and complete the appointment.

George Tkalych is a retired medical professional with years of experience in working with young children.

Source : http://www.wsj.com/articles/how-surgeons-stay-focused-for-hours-1479310052

As a former ear, nose and throat surgeon, George Tkalych carried out many tonsillectomy procedures and even innovated the use of lasers for the issue in the 1980s. While it is important that the procedure itself it carried out properly, the post-surgery period is crucial to the success of a tonsillectomy. Patients should always listen to the advice their doctors provide them with, while also keeping these tips in mind.

Chart Your Pain Medicine

The aftermath of a tonsillectomy can often be painful, which means your doctor will prescribe medication to help you deal with the issue. It is crucial that you understand the correct dosages and take your medicine at the right times. The best way to do this is to chart your medicine intake so you never take more than you need.

Prepare For Your Return

You will likely have spent a number of days in the hospital during the procedure, but you will still be in recovery when you return home. If you come home and try to instantly get back into your daily routine you may hamper your recovery. Instead, have a recovery space prepared for your return and enlist the help of family and friends to help you through it.

Stay Positive

George Tkalych advised many patients on what to do in the aftermath of a tonsillectomy procedure. Do not allow yourself to be discouraged by the pain you feel immediately after surgery. Remember that the procedure will help you and eventually the pain will subside so you can get back to normal. Keep a positive mentality and your recovery will go well.

After enjoying a medical career that spanned thirty-two years, George Tkalych is now able to reflect on what he accomplished and enjoys reminiscing about the path he took to achieve what he did in his career. His education was pivotal in his journey and this holds true for almost all medical professionals. Medical school offers a challenge the likes of which many students will not have faced up to that point, so keep these pointers in mind to make the most of it and succeed.

George Tkalych

George Tkalych

It’s Okay To Be Overwhelmed

You will be bombarded with a lot of information from the moment you start medical school, which can make it very easy to feel overwhelmed. This is completely natural and it is how you respond to these feelings that will define you as a student. Accept that medical school is going to be difficult and dig deep to find what you need to overcome those challenges.

Don’t Cram

Cramming is one of the worst things you can do as a medical student because it results in fatigue and missed information that could prove valuable. This can cause issues in your tests and that mentality taken forward into your career can be devastating to patients. Schedule time into each day to revise and research, rather than trying to leave everything to the last minute.

Take Time For Yourself

George Tkalych maintained a number of interests outside of medicine during his career. If you don’t take time for yourself every so often you will find that the stress of your work builds up to the point where it negatively effects your wellbeing.